Daves Floor Sanding | Minnesota Hardwood Floors

Is hardwood flooring a good investment?

In short, the answer is absolutely yes. We understand that purchasing quality hardwood flooring can be a large initial investment for your home, but when properly installed and maintained, hardwood flooring will increase the value of your home. Home re-modelers, buyers, and builders often choose hardwood over other floor covering choices, including: ceramic tile, laminate, concrete, carpet, or vinyl flooring. Hardwood flooring’s natural durability, flexibility and versatility make it the flooring of choice. Don’t be intimidated by hardwood flooring prices; the longevity of this floor covering option makes it more than worth the cost. Be sure to consult the professionals at Dave’s Floor Sanding when starting your flooring purchase process. We will ensure that you get the advice you need every step of the way.

Hardwood Flooring in Minnesota: Choosing the right flooring

In Minnesota we enjoy the luxury of all the seasons including winter which can cause floor gaps otherwise known as "Hardwood Floor Cracks". Thankfully several good solutions to this problem exist. 

Choosing the wood flooring:

Many "Engineered Flooring" manufacturers will void the warranties if the RH range goes beyond the 35 to 55 range so choosing quality hardwood flooring becomes the best solution in states like Minnesota where the relative humidity can have extreme variance regardless of household climate control systems. 

Controlling moisture levels:

Regardless of the flooring you choose keeping your home around the same moisture levels all year around can help prevent gaps and squeaks in many susceptible hardwoods.

Size matters:

2½" hardwood floor planks will shrink half as much as 5" hardwood floor planks, thus the gaps between each plank will be less in the narrower planks. 

The right hardwoods:

Some hardwoods have a better resistance to humidity changes and will shrink less than others so finding the right look and balancing it with the proper hardwood for your home can be a daunting task. The team at Dave's Floor Sanding can help guide you through the process of finding the right flooring for your home. 

Give us a call at: 763 784-3000

Why hardwood floors are better than carpet.


A floor refinished by Dave's Floor Sanding

One of the biggest decisions a homeowner makes, whether building or remodeling, is what type of flooring to use.  Two of the more commonly used options are hardwood floors and carpeting.  Both choices have pros and cons, but what are the benefits of hardwood floors over carpets?

A key pro for hardwood flooring is its durability.  When properly cared for with periodic refinishing, a wood floor can last for hundreds of years; compared to carpeting, which has a maximum life of 10-15 years.

This of course leads to the pro that hardwood floors have the ability to be repaired versus replaced.  No matter how well you care for a floor, inevitably it will wear.  When a hardwood floor begins to show signs of extended use, it needs to merely be sanded and refinished.  However, once a carpeted floor begins to mat and unravel, it will need to be replaced in its entirety.

A bonus to the durability of hardwood flooring is its ability to remain timeless in style.  While carpeting trends seem to come and go, hardwood floors have been used for hundreds of years and have the ability to accommodate various decorating choices.

If you choose, you also have the ability to soften a hardwood floor and gain some of the benefits of carpeting by utilizing rugs.  The opposite is not true on a carpeted floor.

Hardwood flooring tends to be a better choice for individuals with allergies.  Hardwood floors are easier to thoroughly clean and have fewer places for allergens to hide.  In spite of regular cleaning; dirt, dust and the like will settle into a carpeted floor.

Lastly, but not least important, hardwood floors generally are a more ecological choice over carpeting.  Carpeting is most commonly produced using petroleum products, whereas hardwood floors are made from trees or grasses which can be replanted and renewed.

Hardwood floors have many positive traits, but ultimately the choice is one of personal preference.  Contact Dave’s Floor Sanding today to find out more about your hardwood flooring options.

Dave's Hardwood Floor Guide



Also see: Our Hardwood Hardness section on our main website.

Solid hardwood flooring is the favored choice in wood flooring for most home owners. While it is still the favorite choice, it used to be the only choice. Since then more variations of wood floor were developed and introduced to the public, each with their own pros & cons. These new developments included engineered wood, laminate wood, resilient tile that only looked like wood. By solid hardwood flooring, I mean flooring that is solid wood from top to bottom unlike engineered wood flooring which has a plywood base and only topped with hardwood face.
Here is one sentence to explain each of all the different types of solid hardwood flooring:

  • Solid hardwood flooring is wood all the way from top to bottom, which makes it expensive and also will almost always requires professional installation.

Board width options:

  • Plank hardwood flooring are exactly the same as solid hardwood flooring except with boards wider than six inches.
  • Strip hardwood flooring Strip is the most common type of solid hardwood flooring and is just the opposite of plank flooring, ranging from 1 1/2" to 2 1/2" wide.

Types of hardwoods:

  • Domestic hardwood flooring refers to hardwoods indigenous to North American like red oak, maple, alder and cherry.
  • Exotic hardwood flooring are rated as the toughest hardwoods according to the Janka hardness wood toughness scale, making them more expensive than their domestic counterparts.

Other types wood flooring:

  • Hand-scraped wood flooring has become popular these days mainly because they have long, flat lines that create random designs for a very pleasant appearance.
  • Distressed wood flooring is often mistaken for hand-scraped hardwood or machine-scraped hardwood because the way it is machine-beaten very lightly in such a way as to simulate a antique look and feel.
  • Smooth finish hardwood flooring is by far the most common wood flooring which is produced with an incredibly smooth mirror-like surface.
  • Engineered wood flooring is engineered wood flooring that looks like real solid hardwood but is really a veneer of real wood on top of a plywood material.
  • Pre-finished  wood flooring is popular because it comes with a tough polyurethane coat that may be walked on right away.
  • Unfinished wood flooring gives you the option to pick your stain and sealant at the cost of extra materials and labor without much money saved.

Good places to install hardwoods: (Low moisture content)

  • Dining room
  • Bedroom
  • Living room
  • Den
  • Office

Bad places to install hardwoods: (High moisture content)

  • Basements
  • Bathrooms


Reasons why solid hardwood is better than the other options like engineered, laminate, and resilient flooring:

Solidity:

It feels solid because it is 100% complete solid hardwood and nothing else compares to their solid feel.

Structural Properties:

It has structural properties that bridge minor gaps as well as smooth minor bumps which just isn't possible with laminate or resilient flooring.

Resale Value:

It will raise the value of your home more than any of the other options except engineered wood which is about the same.

Deciding on the wood species:

Wood species include oak, maple and many others each with their own variation of hardness and provenance. These are the two factors that will help you decide which wood species is best for your situation.

Provenance is the location which the wood used for the flooring originally came from.

  • Domestic's are the cheaper option and include mild colored wood species like oak, maple and beech.
  • Exotic's tend to be harder woods and have dramatically contrasting colors, these include ipe, kempas and all Brazilian species.

Hardness is how hard or soft the wood used for the flooring is.

  • Soft wood species may dent and scratch over time and include species like heart-pine and ash.
  • Hard wood species are much more dent and scratch resistant and include species like mahogany and Brazilian walnut.

The Janka hardness test measures how much resistance a sample of wood has to denting and wear. It uses a method that measures the force required to embed an 11.28mm steel ball into wood to half the diameter of the ball leaving an indentation in the wood. The following is a list of all the different wood species and where they fall the the Janka hardness scale..

Species
Janka Hardness (pounds-force)
Origin
Australian Buloke
5060
Australia
Lignum vitae / Guayacan / Pockenholz
4500
Australia
Patagonian Rosewood / Curupay / Angico Preto / Piptadenia Macrocarpa / Brazilian Tiger Mahogany
3840
South America
Brazilian Olivewood
3700
Europe
Brazilian Ebony
3692
South America
Ipê / "Brazilian Walnut" / Lapacho
3684
South America
African Pearlwood / Moabi Sometimes: Brazilian Cherry "Lite"
3680
South America
Grey Ironbark
3664
Africa
Bolivian Cherry
3650
South, Central, & North America
Lapacho
3640
South America
Cumaru / "Brazilian Teak" sometimes: "Brazilian Chestnut," "Tiete Chestnut," "South American Chestnut," "Southern Chestnut"
3540
South America
Ebony
3220
Sourthern India & Western Africa
Brazilian Redwood / Paraju / Massaranduba
3190
South America
Yvyraro
3040
South America
Stranded/woven bamboo
3000
South America
Bloodwood
2900
Asia
Red Mahogany, Turpentine
2697
Australia
Southern Chestnut
2670
South & Central America
Spotted Gum
2473
Australia
Brazilian Cherry / Jatoba
2350
Caribbean, South & Central America
Mesquite
2345
South, Central, & North America
Golden Teak
2330
Australia
Santos Mahogany, Bocote, Cabreuva, Honduran Rosewood
2200
South & Central America
Pradoo
2170
Southeast Asia
Brazilian Koa
2160
South America
Sucupira sometimes "Brazilian Chestnut" or "Tiete Chestnut"
2140
South America
Brushbox
2135
Australia
Osage Orange
2040
North America
Karri
2030
Australia
Sydney Blue Gum
2023
Australia
Bubinga
1980
Central Africa
Cameron
1940
Central America
Tallowwood
1933
Australia
Merbau
1925
Southeast Asia & Pacific Islands
Amendoim
1912
South America
Jarrah
1910
Western Australia
Purpleheart
1860
South America
Goncalo Alves / Tigerwood
1850
South America
Hickory / Pecan, Satinwood
1820
North and South America
Afzelia / Doussie / Australian Wormy Chestnut
1810
Africa
Bangkirai
1798
Indonesia
Rosewood
1780
South & Central America
African Padauk
1725
Africa
Blackwood
1720
Southeast Asia
Merbau
1712
Indo-Malayan region, Phillippines, Australia, & Pacific Islands
Kempas
1710
Malaysia & Indonesia
Black Locust
1700
North America
Highland Beech
1686
Australia
Wenge, Red Pine, Hornbeam
1630
Central Africa
Tualang
1624
Southeast Asia
Zebrawood
1575
West Central Africa
True Pine, Timborana
1570
Central America & Brazil
Peroba
1557
Coastal Brazil
Sapele / Sapelli, Kupa'y
1510
West & East Africa
Curupixa
1490
South & Central America
Sweet Birch
1470
North America
Hard Maple / Sugar Maple
1450
North America
Caribbean Walnut
1390
Southeast Europe to Central Asia
Coffee Bean
1390
North America
Natural Bamboo (represents one species)
1380
Asia
Australian Cypress
1375
Australia
White Oak
1360
North America
Tasmanian Oak
1350
Australia
Ribbon Gum
1349
Australia
Ash (White)
1320
North America
American Beech
1300
North America
Red Oak (Northern)
1290
Northern Hemisphere
Caribbean Heart Pine
1280
Central America
Yellow Birch, Iroko
1260
North America
Movingui
1230
West Africa
Heart Pine
1225
North America
Brazilian Mesquite / Carapa Guianensis
1220
South America
Larch
1200
North America
Carbonized Bamboo (represents one species)
1180
Asia
Teak
1155
Indonesia
Cocobolo
1136
Pacific regions of Central America to Southwest Mexico
Brazilian Eucalyptus / Rose Gum
1125
South America
Makore
1100
Africa
Siberian Larch
1100
Russia & Canada
Peruvian Walnut
1080
South America
Boreal
1023
North America
Black Walnut/North American Walnut
1010
North America
Cherry
995
North America
Black Cherry, Imbuia
950
Southern Brazil
Red Maple
950
North America
Boire
940
Africa
Paper Birch
910
North America
Eastern Red Cedar
900
North & Central America
Southern Yellow Pine (Longleaf)
870
North America, Central America, Northern Europe, & Russia
Lacewood, Leopardwood
840
Australia
African Mahogany
830
Africa
Mahogany, Honduran Mahogany
800
South & Central America
Parana
780
South America
Sycamore
770
North America
Shedua
710
Africa
Silver Maple
700
North America
Southern Yellow Pine (Loblolly and Shortleaf)
690
North & Central America
Douglas Fir
660
Western North America
Western Juniper
626
Northern Hemisphere
Alder (Red)
590
North America
Larch
590
North America
Chestnut
540
North America
Hemlock
500
North America
Western White Pine
420
Western North & Central America
Basswood
410
North America
Eastern White Pine
380
Eastern North America
Balsa
100
South & Central America
Cuipo
22
South & Central America